The Killing Joke Comic VS Movie| Review

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I want to start off my saying this is an Opinion piece and in no way shape or form reflects on the opinions of everyone at the Nerd Empire. I openly promote a discussion on the topic and encourage other view points on the subject matter. If I offend anyone, I do apologize.

The Killing Joke movie has been released and I’m sure most of you have read, if not at least heard of the original comic with the same title. Both are equally as dark and DEFINITELY not for the young to read/watch. I will say, I enjoyed both equally as much and it was interesting to see what was similar and different between the two.

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Starting with the movie, the whole story behind why Barbra left as Batgirl, to me, was pretty useless. Honestly there was nothing gained from the story aside from an insight into the relationship (Or lack thereof) between her and Batman. The purpose for adding that little bit is beyond me, though at the beginning there is a comment of wanting to show that things were different. Anyone that knows Batman is aware of this to some extent. That opening could (and should) have been taken away and the same effect would have been given to the movie. Aside from that, there were three additional scenes added that were small but gave just a little bit more to the story. After the batgirl story, we see Batman enter a storage unit where Joker clearly had some fun. Batman goes to talk to Joker, tries to clear the air and end the madness that has been their life, only to find that Joker has escaped. We learn what happens to Barbra to make her the Oracle, and Jim’s own words get thrown back in his face when it comes to how he wants to punish Joker Vs. Batman. Ending with Oracle was pretty sweet, but again not needed. The movie really did a great job in taking the comic and bringing to life the artwork and story of WHO the Joker was before he was created. We never learn a true name in the comic or movie, but it shows a man that wanted to provide for his wife and unborn child, and how one bad day screwed everything up.

The comic book was dark. We have no backstory of Batgirl, and it starts with Batman going to the prison to talk to Joker. The way it ends leaves things up to interpretation, both in comic and in movie. We see Batman and Joker laughing at a joke, but what happens? The artwork was beautiful and captured the twisted darkness that is The Joker. We see the back story and how simple mistakes that have good intentions can turn bad really fast. It really brings out a different side to the characters and just sits with you. You can’t help but to think about the characters to some extent and how the backstory changes things, even just a little bit.

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I enjoyed both the movie and comic very much, and despite the things that were added to the movie, it was over all a good one to watch. I recommend picking up the comic of The Killing Joke if you haven’t already and reading it at some point. I do also recommend checking out the movie and seeing what you think of it. The artwork is great, and with voice actors like Mark Hamill and Kevin Conroy, it’ll feel like watching the old tv shows all over again. I am so happy with the people they got to do the voices and the artwork. It really did feel like they took the comic book and brought it to life. There was VERY little differences between the two. Be sure to not watch this movie with small children around, and keep the comic away from small hands. Both are for MATURE AUDIENCES.

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THIS PART IS MY PERSONAL OPINION AND IN NO WAY REFLECTS THAT OF THE NERD EMPIRE, OR THOSE THAT WROTE THE COMIC/MOVIE

The whole comic and movie was a mind trip, but really brought some insight into the universe as a whole. Joker makes a comment “I’ve demonstrated there’s no difference between me and everyone else! All it takes is one bad day to reduce the sanest man alive to lunacy. That’s how far the world is from where I am. Just one bad day.” That one quote perfectly explains what happened to Joker, and in the animate series, batman paraphrases this to Harley. Seeing that Joker had a wife and unborn child and how their death brought him to his knees, it explains why he cannot love Harley in return. It in NO way justifies the abuse he put her through, but there is at least a possible reason why he is incapable of loving her in return. We see just how much Joker and Batman need each other and as much as Batman doesn’t want either of them to kill each other, it probably is inevitable.

 

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Preacher Episode 2 Review

 

Episode 2 of AMC’s Preacher “See” spends too much time draping a veil of mystery over questions that audiences didn’t bother to ask. With a larger view into the twisted world of Preacher we certainly get fed a new load of information but not much of it is worth knowing. Where this show is beginning to excel is the interactions between characters, impact is felt when words are exchanged. The chemistry between the cast is fun and a wonderful way to pass time until tempers run hot and violence is the only course of action.

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“Say hello to my little friend” 

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Where the X-Men franchise could (should) go next

Fox studio’s X-Men Apocalypse hit theaters last week. It brought everyone’s favorite mutants back to school. This franchise has been around for 16 years. For almost 2 decades we’ve been given consistent X-men flicks whether we wanted them or not. With that many films under Fox studio’s belt you’d think they be masters of the comic-book movie formula. Right? Well, they aren’t. As a matter of fact, most X-men movies are far from perfect. Its been a long time since we’ve gotten a near perfect X-men flick (X-2 came out 2003) but after X-Men Apocalypse we’re closer than ever. Here’s what Fox needs to do in order to get the X-Men franchise where it should belong.

 

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AMC’s Preacher Pilot review


Last Sunday evening  AMC released the first episode of their new ongoing series Preacher. It follows Jesse Custer (Dominic Cooper) as a small town preacher struggling to keep his faith while tending to his flock of church-goers. This new series will be taking on the tough challenge of adapting a crushingly brutal comic that survived the 90’s and amassed a die-hard cult following.

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Book of Death Issue 2 | Review

Book of Death Issue 2

The artwork is as impressive as before, but the plot of Book of Death still fails to make much sense or grab readers’ attention. Following hackneyed storylines about imminent world destruction and an ancient prophecy, this superhero comic tries and fails to be more than a knockoff of The Avengers. The high-energy battles and cryptic dialogue about mystical forces would be much more enjoyable if we had more access to backstory, but the comic immediately assumes that we already understand every character’s motivations and history, and the result of reading it feels like arriving to a party after it already started and not recognizing anyone there.

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Book Of Death: Legends Of The Geomancer Issue 2 | Review

Book of Death: Legends of the Geomancer Issue 2

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Book of Death: Legends of the Geomancer

Book of Death: Legends of the Geomancer

Origin stories are a massive challenge to write. The most basic plot details and facts of the story need to be established and ideally guide the subsequent developments. Legends of the Geomancer has yet to meaningfully connect to other installments of the Book of Death comics, but as its own independent comic, it boasts violently gorgeous art, brave characters, and the promise of something more interesting and dramatic to come. The cliffhanger raises the stakes to a high level, and I’m actually quite excited for the next issue to come out.

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